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Aniseikonia related frequently asked questions (FAQ)

 

If you still have a question about aniseikonia after reading this and the 'about aniseikonia' web-page, please send us an e-mail.

 


  1. Who can help me with my aniseikonia?
  2. Can meridional (direction dependent) aniseikonia also be corrected?
  3. My aniseikonia symptoms seem to be related to relatively large objects (large field angles), while for lower field angles I have more aniseikonia?


  1. Who can help me with my aniseikonia?
    Aniseikonia is a condition that most eye care providers (ECPs) will be familiar with.  However, before the Aniseikonia Inspector software was introduced, there was not really an easy tool to fully manage aniseikonia, i.e. both measuring the aniseikonia and designing correcting lenses.  So (as you may have noticed), there are currently not many ECPs equipped with the tools and knowledge to manage aniseikonia.  If you cannot find a local ECP to manage your aniseikonia, you could maybe ask a local ECP if he/she might be interested in trying out a free trial version of the Aniseikonia Inspector to manage your aniseikonia.  A free trial of the software can be requested (by ECPs) here.
     
  2. Can meridional (direction dependent) aniseikonia also be corrected?
    In a glasses-only correction the meridional aniseikonia could be corrected by bitoric lens(es).  The amount of correction will be limited to a couple of percent though.  Also the lenses are probably expensive, because they are difficult to make.  Meridional aniseikonia may also be corrected with a cylindrical contacts-glasses combination.  However, the amount here may be limited too because of the possible induced anisophoria.
     
  3. My aniseikonia symptoms seem to be related to relatively large objects (large field angles), while for lower field angles I have more aniseikonia?
    This relates to the problem of what field angle is most important to correct in field-dependent aniseikonia.  Historically, aniseikonia is presented as a percentage perceived image size difference (optically-induced aniseikonia is field independent when presented as a percentage).  However, with our recent findings that aniseikonia may be field dependent, more research is needed on how to determine what aniseikonia at what field angles cause the most aniseikonic symptoms.  In this discussion, one of the factors to take into account is for example the absolute aniseikonia instead of the relative aniseikonia (in percent).  For example, a 10% aniseikonia at 1 degree field angle means that there is a non-correspondence between the two eyes of 0.1 degree.  However, an aniseikonia of 'only' 4% at 8 degree field angle means that there is a non-correspondence of more than 0.3 degree, which is three times as much as the non-correspondence at 1 degree.